TriplePoints of Interest – Week of February 8

Gaming is becoming more and more integrated into mainstream culture. Players and viewership are rising, and nothing can say that better than the phenomenal 2015 streaming platform Twitch had. Larger companies have taken note too as Amazon jumps into the game development sector with their newest game engine, Lumberyard. Yahoo is also joining in the fun as they start developing their own eSports vertical.  Continue reading TriplePoints of Interest – Week of February 8

LEGO Universe Lands on TODAY Show, Tech-Savvy Parents Take Note

LEGO bricks aren’t just for building. Anyone who has ever clicked together a LEGO model of their own can tell you… the real satisfaction comes from sharing your creations with someone else. LEGO inevitably has the power to inspire everyone around it, to build something – anything they might dream up – and the only limit is having enough LEGO bricks to build it. Usually…

But not in LEGO Universe (a TriplePoint client). Here, you can snag all the virtual building blocks your imagination can handle. That’s if you even decide to build – what with all the new worlds to explore and baddies to beat. That, and quests, missions and  minigames to tackle, challenges to overcome, problems to solve… Did I mention LEGO minifigures to customize!? You get the idea – there are a ton of ways to play, build and connect with other players in the MMOG – all in a vivid online playground that adheres to top-notch LEGO safety standards.

So you can understand, then, why the TODAY Show would list LEGO Universe as one of their top tools for tech-savvy parents to connect with their kids. Yahoo’s web life editor, Heather Cabot showed TODAY’s Natalie Morales what’s what earlier this week – check it!

From “Cyber parenting: Tech-savvy ways to connect with kids” on TODAY, Monday April 4

[LEGO Universe ~2:10 minute mark]

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Future of Media

Some of the most forward-thinking leaders within the entertainment industry attended the Future of Media conference today at the Stanford Graduate School of Business to discuss the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead in the media industry. The discussion panels covered topics including the future of interactive entertainment, television and film, social media and news, music, and entrepreneurship within the media landscape. It seems that while the future is uncertain, business leaders and innovators within the space see a shift toward more interactive entertainment as the long-standing distinctions between creators of content and distributors of information are expected to break down.

Terry Semel shared his views and predictions for the future of the industry as the keynote speaker. Currently the Chariman and CEO of Windsor Media, Semel was previously the Chairman and CEO of Yahoo! from 2001 through 2007. Before heading Yahoo!, Semel was Chairman and co-CEO of successful entertainment giant, Warner Bros. Semel predicted that the stereotypes of “Hollywood” as the home of content creation and “Silicon Valley” as the strictly high-tech hub will break down and become irrelevant. Semel believes that these two worlds are colliding as technology companies are interacting more with media companies and vice versa. Studios are no longer in complete control since user-generated content is becoming more prevalent online along with the rapid growth of YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. At the same time, great technology needs compelling content that people will pay for in order to survive as people begin to  interact with media on portable gadgets. Semel noted that traditionally straight technology companies, such as Sony or Microsoft, will provide other services because they want to expand into the media business.

One question that kept reoccurring throughout the day was how content will be monetized in the future. Semel had a simple solution for this. He declared that companies are foolish to give away quality content for free and believes that ads should definitely be used to monetize media. He pointed out that people aren’t so averse to advertisements that contain humor, exemplified by the tradition of households across the nation tuning into the Super Bowl, in part, to be entertained by amusing ads. Semel explained that social websites such as Facebook don’t have to necessarily charge their audience for access to their platform, but they can easily earn revenue from companies that want to reach those millions of valuable eyeballs. Despite the rapidly evolving media industry, businesses are still operating to turn profits and everyone seemed to agree that content will not continue to be free forever.